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Clarington launches #SpreadLove social media campaign to spread good news and community unity

Clarington March 31, 2020/- As a show of community unity, the Municipality of Clarington is launching a #SpreadLove social media campaign as we unite to face the challenges of COVID-19. Clarington is asking all residents to join us in this campaign and show your love for your community while maintaining a safe physical distance.

“We are launching this campaign to encourage residents to stay social while physically distancing. As we all turn to social media for engagement and human contact, we can also show how we are dealing with this current situation. We are in this together, and together we will overcome,” said Clarington Mayor Adrian Foster.

The Gratitude Garden at Lakeridge Health Bowmanville

Here’s how residents can participate:

  • Change your Facebook profile photo to include our Clarington frame. When you go to change your photo, you can also add and search for a frame, look for Clarington, #SpreadLove.
  • Tag us on Facebook (@MunofClarington)  and Twitter (@ClaringtonON) and show us photos of how you and your family are coping with this situation. Document any acts of kindness and how you are reaching out to your community. We will share and retweet and #SpreadLove.

Add the hashtag #SpreadLove to all your posts and include #DurhamStrong. We are a resilient community and look after each other.

“Love and kindness are infectious. As we face this unprecedented challenge of COVID-19, there are many ways we can spread love, happiness and hope. Join this campaign and tell us how you have #SpreadLove in Clarington,” added Mayor Foster.

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Media Contact:
Basia Radomski
Communications Manager
905-623-3379 ext. 2214

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